Translation Industry, Translation Theory and Practice, Translator Training

Shortcomings of (Untrained) Native Translators

Should translations be done exclusively by native speakers of the target ("into") language? This question has recently come up in several publications. The language industry and training programs in the US predominantly answer in the affirmative. I have speculated about some possible reasons for this attitude. A recent article in the American Translators Association (ATA)… Continue reading Shortcomings of (Untrained) Native Translators

Professional Updates, Translation Industry

Lessons Learned from ATA 56th Annual Conference

This year I attended the American Translators Association (ATA) annual conference after a three-year gap. This post is a quasi-debriefing of what I thought went well this time and what I need to concentrate on in the following years. By its nature, the list will be specific to me and may not reflect everyone's priorities and… Continue reading Lessons Learned from ATA 56th Annual Conference

Language and Society, Translation Industry

Three Things Media Gets Wrong About Interpreting

There is rarely a political drama, sci-fi story, or fantasy saga that does not involve communication across languages. It is, therefore, fair to say the general public is aware of interpreting as a profession. However, these fictional tales are often written by people not intimately familiar with language industry; nor is interpreting usually central to the story.… Continue reading Three Things Media Gets Wrong About Interpreting

Translation Industry, Translator Training

Origins of the Native-Speaker Translator Preference

An idea you hear repeated by translator training programs, translation companies and clients alike is that a translator should only work into their native language; that is, that any translation should be produced by a native speaker of the language into which it is done. I would like to examine the reasons behind this notion,… Continue reading Origins of the Native-Speaker Translator Preference

Translation Industry

Overview of (Some) Language Services

You may hear translation tasks referred to by many different names. Naturally, this may be very confusing for the translation services buyer. Why is my language service provider talking about localization instead of translation? What is the difference between editing and proofreading? In this post, I will try to cover some of the common translation-related… Continue reading Overview of (Some) Language Services

Translation Industry

Adaptation in Food Translation

As the only (advanced) Russian speaker in our company, I sometimes need to consult my colleagues on certain translation choices and conventions. A question I was asked recently was whether the "BLT" in the translated name of a menu item would make sense to the readers and whether it should be left in English. This… Continue reading Adaptation in Food Translation

Russian, Translation Industry

April Issue: Things to Consider for Localization into Russian

In my personal and professional life I have often encountered social networking that have been localized into Russian. More often than not, localization into Russian reveals internationalization issues that should have been addressed at the design stage. I would like to point out some of the things to consider if you plan localizing your site… Continue reading April Issue: Things to Consider for Localization into Russian

Translation Industry

Translator or Interpreter?

To continue the thread about the distinction between translators and interpreters, I'd like to examine translator-/interpreter-training programs. I am currently enrolled in a program that concentrates solely on translation. While it is pretty self-evident that translation and interpreting are different tasks that require different (though sometimes overlapping) sets of skills, there are programs that combine… Continue reading Translator or Interpreter?

Translation Industry

Expectations from Translators

It often makes me sad to see job descriptions for translators on Russian job search websites. A lot of times employers will want the translator to perform additional duties as a secretary, personal assistant, manager, etc. Moreover, as you might have read in this blog, people in Russia often don't distinguish between a translator and… Continue reading Expectations from Translators